Tag Archives: flooring for post frame buildings

3 Steps for Perfect Concrete Flooring in Post Frame Buildings

Concrete flooring in post frame building.

Concrete flooring is a great choice for post frame buildings. High-quality concrete flooring may be one of the essential components of your post frame building plan. Depending on the building’s principal function, a long-lasting and durable concrete floor will keep the contents clean and dry, facilitate ease of movement, and provide a more functional workspace. It can also help to extend the life of the equipment entering and leaving the building.

Pouring concrete flooring for new or existing post frame buildings can be expensive. However, the benefits owners receive for years to come may pay for the initial investment. The benefits are even more significant if the job is done correctly from the beginning.

Before pouring concrete flooring in post frame buildings, the building owner and designer must address three major issues. These are:

What will be the primary functions of the post frame structure?

Designing a floor to withstand the expected loads requires planning and foresight. Considerations may include:

  • How heavy is the equipment, machinery, or stored inventories that the flooring will bear? Remember future equipment is likely to be heavier and that, over time, more items will find their way into the structure as needs grow.
  • How much maneuvering will be required? While this factor also contributes to the total square footage decision, moving equipment throughout the building adds to the wear and tear of the flooring.
  • How will we heat the building? Radiant heating from coils in the floor can be a terrific asset, particularly in workshops and maintenance areas where humans will be working. Naturally, this is a decision that must be made in advance.

Proper Site Preparation

Site prep for a post frame structure is less complicated than with other construction methods. The primary objective is to ensure the space is level with appropriate sloping for any drainage.

To avoid premature cracking and deterioration, the building site must be compact and level when placing an aggregate subgrade.

Following this first step, a compacted gravel layer should be placed to facilitate drainage. This will also support the concrete layer. Certifying that this layer is once again level and uniform is a critical step before installing the concrete.

You may wish to let the subfloor settle further while the rest of the building is completed. This can help eliminate the potential for subsequent settling and shifting in certain areas after the concrete is in place.

Determining the Thickness of the Concrete Flooring

Determining the thickness of the concrete application and the type of reinforcement depends on what will be stored in the new post frame building.

A proven post frame building expert or a qualified concrete expert will recommend the best thickness for your needs. They will take into account the uses and combined gross weights of the equipment and materials that will be housed. Specific guidelines exist, although each building owner’s needs are unique.

For example, experts recommend a concrete thickness of at least six inches for heavy-duty tractors, earth movers, and dump trucks. However, lighter vehicles, including standard-sized pickup trucks, campers, and automobiles only require four inches of concrete. This will be substantial enough to survive wear and tear and provide maximum service.

Reinforcing components can also add to the life of a concrete floor. Reinforcements embedded in the concrete are a normal application to help the flooring last longer and withstand the weight and various forces.

Concrete reinforcement often consists of steel rebar or horizontal metal rods in a grid across the floor. While other reinforcement materials are available, your post frame design expert will recommend products based on your needs and budget.

Contact Pacemaker Post Frame Buildings

A longtime manufacturer, designer, and builder of post frame buildings for a variety of functions, Pacemaker Post Frame Buildings of North Webster, Indiana, is a leader in innovation and quality for clients in Northern Indiana, Southwest Michigan, and Northwest Ohio.

Experienced in all phases of post frame construction, the Pacemaker professionals will offer design ideas, quality components, and high-quality solutions for any structure.

Check out the Gallery of some of Pacemaker’s completed projects to learn about their buildings’ versatility, durability, and functionality.

For more information about Pacemaker Post Frame Buildings, visit the company website or call their experts at +1-888-834-4448.

How to Choose the Best Flooring Options for Your Post Frame Building

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Flooring options for a modern post frame building depend on how you plan to use your building. Post frame building purposes have now evolved beyond the simple pole barn. Now post frame structures are commonly used for fire stations, auto dealerships, retail outlets, warehouses, schools, and churches. Let’s look into how to choose the best flooring options for your post frame building.

For any purpose, you must anticipate your needs and accommodate all the ways in which you will use the building. If heavy equipment and vehicles are moving in and out of the building, you must ensure the flooring option is able to sustain the stress of massive weight.

Pre-Prep for post frame building flooring options

Post frame floors of any kind will last much longer if the footprint is level, compact, and allows for proper drainage. In many instances, a gravel base and supplemental subflooring material may be required. Local building codes may also dictate the minimum thickness and other attributes for your post frame flooring.

Options for Flooring

Concrete

Concrete flooring is the most popular option for any post frame buildings that are not being used for housing animals. This material is best for machinery and vehicles. Concrete is easy to clean and also reduces the accumulation of dust and moisture. Long-lasting, concrete is perfect for workshops, garages, and structures where people will congregate. Incorporating insulation in the concrete flooring system can also improve the comfort level of the building.

Asphalt

Since asphalt often less expensive than concrete, many building owners opt to use this material for vehicle and equipment storage. However, since this material is softer, it tends to break down sooner. This can leave large gaps and crevices that can sprout weeds unless adequately patched. Asphalt requires maintenance and may not be adequate for heavier machinery. Consider the weight of your vehicle and how often you will be moving them.

Also, remember that newly spread asphalt has a strong odor that may remain during the early months following application. Proper ventilation is advised when choosing this flooring option.

Stone

Natural or cultured stone is available in many sizes, shapes, types, and weights. Make sure the stone you select can sustain the usage and weight you might expect before you commit.

Stone flooring types can be marble, limestone, travertine, or more. Stone is an attractive option for residences and buildings where people will be congregating. This type of flooring can also help to keep the structure cooler in the summer months.

Gravel

Gravel is relatively clean and will prevent any erosion issues from developing within the building. Over time, the material will become compacted, so it does require some maintenance. You’ll need to supplement regularly to maintain the floor level at the original height and to keep dust from appearing.

Dirt

If aesthetics are not a primary concern, dirt represents the least expensive and softest flooring material. For horses and other livestock, dirt is a natural option and is most comfortable for them. Be aware that the soil and moisture within the building can shift to make footing unstable. So you may choose to regrade the surface periodically. Or you could easily upgrade to another material if you begin to use the building for other uses.

Be aware that during rainy periods, your dirt floor will become muddy in places, particularly near the entrances.

Livestock Matting

Dirt flooring alone will quickly become rutted and uneven with heavy livestock traffic. Mats made from rubber or aggregate materials create a comfortable surface and keep stalls and tack areas from eroding. These can be applied to specific areas of your horse barn or other buildings.

Contact Pacemaker Post Frame Buildings

Pacemaker has been at the forefront of post frame construction development for over three decades. As a designer, supplier, and builder of high-quality materials and construction, Pacemaker Post Frame Buildings, located in North Webster, Indiana, has far-reaching experience with each type of post frame application and process.

You may visit Pacemaker’s Gallery to view many of the company’s past accomplishments in post frame innovation.

To learn more about your flooring options for your post frame building, contact the professionals at Pacemaker at 1-888-834-4448.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flooring for Post Frame Buildings

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Flooring for your new post frame building is an important consideration.

The best flooring material for a building depends on the structure’s intended purpose, the degree of durability required for the use, and personal preferences.

Post frame buildings that house and utilize heavy equipment and vehicles, as is the case with barns or automotive repair shops, should have a hard and durable surface capable of withstanding substantial loads and the potentially damaging impact of heavy objects. This weight factor is particularly crucial for production facilities, warehouses, fire stations, automotive service and repair, and, in many cases, modern barns and agricultural structures where heavy equipment is present.

Concrete is the Most Common

Concrete is the material of choice for heavy-duty, durable flooring. For many workshops or agricultural post frame buildings, a six-inch concrete layer poured over six inches of compacted gravel. Then covered by a moisture-resistant, insulating barrier is generally sufficient. However, when heavy equipment is involved, rebar or wire mesh added in the concrete layer is warranted.

In cold climates, insulating material should completely cover the entire sand or gravel base and extend from beneath the concrete at last six inches up the adjoining walls. This insulation, combined with appropriate wall insulation, will help keep the floor warm. Additionally. many owners choose to heat the floor with hot water tubing or electrical coils embedded in the concrete.

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Note that local building codes may specify the minimum thickness and other attributes for floors.

Heavy Loads

The flooring must be strong enough to withstand substantial weight without cracking or damage. As a result, post frame building designers should calculate enough strength and reinforcement to withstand the weight of all equipment and vehicles.

When pieces of heavy machinery are stationary, the concrete flooring should be reinforced to accommodate the load. Since heavy equipment like cranes and tractors are mobile, designers must make sure the concrete surface is sturdy enough to support the weight of this machinery.

If equipment locations, sizes, or travel patterns should change in the future, the flooring must be a primary consideration.

Think about the Access Surfaces

The entry points and access surfaces outside the post frame building should be substantial as well. Moving equipment and heavy vehicles into the building requires a durable transition surface be in place.  This is not something to skimp on or neglect in your pre-planning.

When to Pour the Concrete

The best time to pour the concrete slab is after the shell and roof are in place. Pouring “under roof” also allows for heating elements to be installed. Thus, protecting them from rain or snow during the final stages of production.

Contact Pacemaker Post Frame Buildings

For nearly forty years, Pacemaker Post Frame Buildings has been a North American leader in the design, manufacture, and construction of modern post frame buildings. These structures include beautiful and highly functional agricultural, municipal, civic, equestrian, and residential structures.

To see examples of Pacemaker’s diverse portfolio of projects and learn about their unique process, visit the Pacemaker website.

For more information regarding flooring or any other aspects of modern post frame construction, call Pacemaker Post Frame Buildings at +1-888-834-4448.

Alternatively, enter your information on the brief Contact Form with any question you have. A Pacemaker professional will contact you within one business day.